The Past Uncovered, the Future…….??

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The SW corner of 40th Ave. and Lake Street, under remodel by developer Julius Jaeger DeRoma of Clubhouse Jäger in the North Loop, reveals a once gem of a corner dairy store. Ken and Jack’s had frozen meats and no doubt the rest of a local dairy store’s offerings. Video Lease, one of the last of the dvd and video rental shops other than Redbox in the area, used to be at 3927 until recently. What is the future for this site? Plans unknown but 3931 to 3927 Lake Street have recently been permitted by developer DeRoma and work inside is ongoing. A peek in the window revealed nicely preserved, yet unfinished, wood floors. DeRoma now holds developments at Lyn-Lake with ground level retail space and living space above as well as Clubhouse Jäger a trendy bar in the North Loop. Whatever will be, East Lake St. is forever changing!

Photo: Megan Longtine-Jones

Fewer Guns More Peace

Fewer Guns More Peace

Meet Beth a Longfellow resident who makes her point by biking. A social worker by profession on her way to work early this morning she crossed my path on her bike as I was out and about taking photos. When I saw her bike sign I followed her (okay chased her in my car, do not do this it scares people!) to catch up with her hoping for a conversation and possibly a photo. She was more than cordial when she realized that I was not out to get her! As you can see by her bike sign her soapbox issue is we need more peace and fewer guns. “Guns (hand guns and assault weapons) are designed primarily to kill humans. Let’s think about this. Let’s talk about this. Let’s do something.” We had a great conversation about all sides of the issue and how tricky or should I say delicate it is these days (or really as always I guess) to have such conversations. Thanks Beth, I am with you for more peace with fewer guns!

Photo: Megan Longtine-Jones

Work Weekday Wrap-Up: W3 – The Friday Photographer

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Wow, this year has just flown by! I remember how excited I was that January 1st was a Friday and I got to start the ball rolling. I am so grateful to have been part of the Longfellow365 Project. It has challenged me creatively, photography skill-wise and life- and time-wise. There were many l days when I would all of a sudden say (actually several times in one day), “eek, it’s Friday, I need to take a photo”! Panic!! But once I grabbed my three cameras and started the hunt peace and quiet took over and I could see the neighborhood differently. Many days I would find so many people, places, things, and landscapes that I wanted to photograph (and I did photograph them all) and then it was hard to choose. Some of these ideas I ‘kept in my back pocket’ for when I was in a pinch on a Friday and could go right to a spot and shoot.

My interpretation of the project was to describe the overall nature of the Longfellow neighborhood in photographs; often from the perspective of past, present and future. I think one of my favorite parts of this project was seeing the photos from the other photographers. Again, there was many a day when I said, “Whaaaat! Where did they find that? Or huh, how did they do that?” I learned a lot about photography and the neighborhood from them. My colleagues and I have produced some excellent photographs, while documenting the many changes occurring in the Longfellow neighborhood throughout 2016.

Lastly, I would not have made it through this entire year without the help and encouragement of my husband, Craig Longtine. He has a different eye than I do and often his eye was helpful when I was befuddled and wanted to send five photographs! Many thanks to Guthrie Byard for all the behind the scenes (or behind the photographs) work that he does so that we are able to do the front part – the photographs.

Welcome 2017 photographers, look differently and shoot ‘out of the box’, that is where the fun comes in! Cheers and Happy New Year!

Photo: Megan Longtine-Jones

East Lake Street History: Wonderland Amusement Park

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Wonderland Amusement Park opened in 1905 between Lake & 32nd St. and 31st & 32nd Avenues. Some of the popular attractions were roller coaster, miniature train, carousel, and the “House of Nonsense, but the Infantorium was the biggest hit. Visitors could watch nurses taking care of premature babies in newly invented incubators, a marvel for the time.

Wonderland closed six years later in 1911 as attendance dropped, equipment deteriorated and street maintenance fees rose. You can see the full story of Wonderland on the placard at Lake St. and 31st Avenue.

See the YouTube video about Wonderland: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bk-WrcnWtaI

Photo: Megan Longtine-Jones